Yew is a highly toxic evergreen tree, with showy, red berries and flat, green needles.
It symbolizes death and rebirth, allowing contact, control, and raising of the dead.

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Bored of the standard D&D 5e herbalism kit? Check out the tools and supplies your herbalist and alchemist would really use!

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by Anna Urbanek

I have been given a carte blanche by our lovely dungeon master to do whatever the hell I want with my D&D character, so I made her an absolute menace.

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by Jakub Wisz

In the previous part of the Aurorae dev blog I talked about the Khradi and their way of life around the frozen isles lost in the mists on the far orbit of the planetoid Maer. In this blog I’m gonna talk about the denizens of Maer, another major culture shaping the outlook on life in Aurorae – the Triveni, constantly dubbed The Mushroom People by Anna.

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by Anna Urbanek

In this episode we go on deep dives into my favorite topics: occult and plants. And we’re being very critical of what we read. I don’t know why, but I happen to apply higher standard to occult books, maybe because it’s so easy for them to go into ‘woo’ territory if the authors don’t pay enough attention.

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By Jakub Wisz

It’s been a while since the previous Aurorae development blog – and so here we are. I think the best next step in bringing the game a bit closer to you will be through a series of articles describing the lore and rules of the game interchangeably. In this first one of the series, I’ll describe (mostly quoting the current Core Rule Book draft) one of the playable Kinships in the game – the adventurous sailors known throughout the void as the Khradi.

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by Anna Urbanek

Welcome to the new series of posts on the blog! Librarian’s Nook will cover the latest books read in my constant pursuit of knowledge. These books are all, in one way or another, research – either for the project at hand, for the books planned in the future, or for satiating my endless curiosity of the world. As many of them will be useful to other worldbuilders, I’ve figured I might as well share my notes. These not reviews; there won’t be any rating systems, and the main criterions will be usefulness and general enjoyment.

What can you expect in this series? A variety of books, mostly nonfiction, covering natural sciences, history, occult, and folklore, with a side dish of other topics if I find whatever I’m currently reading useful from a worldbuilding perspective. Fiction won’t feature too heavily – I rarely read it, and when I do, it’s mostly fairy tales, myths, and legends. The majority of books will be in English, with an occasional Polish title.

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A majestic, cold-loving plant bearing heavy crowns of green flowers. Its unique licorice-like taste and musky scent grant it multiple culinary uses.

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I don’t always write blog posts, but when I do, I don’t know where to start. I’ll start at the beginning then – and I’m not one for long introductions. And so, welcome to the introductory blog post about Project Aphelion’s parallel upcoming game, Blazing Aurorae.

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A popular garden plant, grown for its beautiful golden and orange flowers. Often used to cure skin irritations, strengthen psychic powers, and see through illusions.

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by Anna Urbanek

Get ready for the spooky!

Today we will be talking about the spookiest plants you can put in your Halloween game. We’re not here to discuss the most toxic plants, because let’s be honest – death by poison is a rather boring thing to play out at the table. Instead, we’re about to go for a deep dive into the weirdest, the creepiest, and most horrifying. 

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When I made a character who wanted to be an arcane researcher, one thing was obvious: custom spells. However, Shadowrun is not D&D 5e or Pathfinder, and third-party content is neither supported nor really created, leaving the mages with a rather limited spell list, most of them geared towards shadowrunning.

As I like making life hard for myself, I made a character who doesn’t want to be a shadowrunner.

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